This analysis of Wikipedia controversies is really cool and a little sad

ふーむ。

Gigaom

I don’t know what it says about the English-speaking world (OK, in this case probably the United States) that its Wikipedia contributors disagree more about professional wrestlers than nearly any other topic, but it can’t be good. It’s one of numerous interesting, if not always surprising, findings from a group of international researchers who determined the most-controversial Wikipedia articles across 10 different languages. (Hat tip to the MIT Technology Review’s Physics arXiv Blog; Wired Science’s Social Dimension blog also covered an earlier draft of this research in May.)

The researchers, who come from Oxford, Rutgers and two Hungarian institutions, identified the articles by creating a formula based upon the number of mutual reversions each article receives (essentially when Editor X reverts Editor Y’s edit back to the original form, and then Editor Y returns the favor). Here are the top 10 controversial articles in each language they analyzed: English…

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NASA Open Source Agreement (NOSA) license: Good Start

NOSAについて調べてみたい。

Bryant Group

01-Open-Source-SummitFrom time to time I give talks, often to government folks or folks that do business with government, about open source licenses and building communities across industry boundaries.  A number of years ago NASA blazed new trails for the US federal government when they submitted their custom open source license and was successful in having it added to the list of OSI approved licenses, were it remains today.

Over the last several years NASA has asked for advice about its license, which many in the industry and community have suggested limits participation outside of government in a long and valuable list of projects.  In 2011 and 2012 NASA was encouraged, cajoled, nudged and knocked over the head with power point slides suggesting they would be much better off landing on widely accepted license.

Because it comes up often, and I keep loosing track of the best details, I’m parking a…

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Who needs a smartwatch? This shirt monitors breathing and heart rate

やっぱりでていた、Tシャツ・センサ

Gigaom

Sensors that monitor wellness are cropping up in bracelets, phones, socks and even inside the human body. But startup OMsignal noticed they were missing from one particularly ubiquitous possession: the shirt. Later this year, they’ll launch a compression shirt capable of reading a person’s heart rate, breathing levels and movement.

The shirt meant to be worn under everyday clothes or on its own at the gym. The data it collects is sent to a a computer or smartphone app where the user can view instant and long-term exertion, stress and even mood. The app can share data with loved ones, including sending an alert when it detects high stress or a potentially dangerous situation.

OMsignal shirt and software

The company’s major breakthrough was figuring out how to weave the sensors into the shirt during the manufacturing process. They are placed just below the chest to best collect heart and breathing data. Redmond, Wash…

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